Subject:  Unidentifiable CaterpillarS
Geographic location of the bug:  Roseville, CA
Date: 11/12/2019
Time: 06:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this is?  They denuded my redbud tree. How can I prevent them from returning. Organic pesticides had no effect whatsoever. Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Sharon

Red-Humped Caterpillar

Dear Sharon,
This is a Red-Humped Caterpillar,
Schizura concinna, which you can find pictured on BugGuide.  According to the University of California Integrated Pest Management site:  “Young caterpillars commonly feed side-by-side in groups, chewing on the lower leaf surface. As the larvae grow, they tend to disperse and feed in smaller groups or individually. Skeletonized leaves are a common result, as the older caterpillars chew all the way through and consume leaves, leaving only the larger, tough veins. … When their abundance is low, larvae eat leaves on only a few branch terminals. Occasionally, heavy infestations develop and defoliate entire trees during the summer. Usually only scattered individual and young trees are severely defoliated. If severely defoliated, trees that are otherwise healthy usually recover.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this grub?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mill Creek, Washington
Date: 11/05/2019
Time: 12:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have come across this little guy multiple times over the years when in the yard weeding and am curious what it is.  Any info would be appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristen

Leather Jacket

Dear Kristen,
We believe you have encountered the larva of a Crane Fly like the ones pictured on BugGuide and again on BugGuide and you may read about them on the Missouri Department of Conservation site.  Charles Hogue in his book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin calls Crane Fly larvae Leather Jackets because of their “thick dark skin.”  Capital Regional District uses the name Leatherjacket.

Subject:  Identify Bug Please
Geographic location of the bug:  Keene, NH USA
Date: 11/06/2019
Time: 04:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  All I know is it gives off an awfule scent. What kind of bug is it and where is the scent coming from?
How you want your letter signed:  Frank F

Caddisfly

Dear Frank,
This is a Caddisfly, an insect with an aquatic nymph, so Caddisflies are generally found near a source of water.  We cannot ever recall any scent when we have encountered Caddisflies, nor can we recall reading about strong smells associated with Caddisflies, so we tried to research the matter.  There is no mention of an odor emanating from the insects in the Central Arizona Project page on Caddisflies nor is there a mention of an odor on the Encyclopaedia Britannica page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia
Date: 11/05/2019
Time: 03:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this tiny bug outside while rooting through my garage, never seen it before and curious as to what it is. In the picture is the bug with a small paperclip to show size. The season is autumn, early November.
How you want your letter signed:  Curiosity

Lacewing Larva

Dear Curiosity,
This is a Lacewing larva, sometimes called an Aphid Wolf.  Lacewings are one of the most agriculturally important predators because of the large numbers of Aphids and other plant pests that an individual will consume over its lifetime.

Subject:  Big ass spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Statenisland NY 10312
Date: 11/06/2019
Time: 07:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this this big a×× spider…. it jumps
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks Elizabeth

Fishing Spider

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  Though it is large and frightening, Fishing Spiders are not aggressive towards humans and the bite is not considered dangerous.

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Harrisonburg, VA
Date: 11/07/2019
Time: 02:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This creepy crawler landed on my son-in-law while we were at the winery. It was so interesting I snapped a photo. But! I can’t figure out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Paula

Wheel Bug

Dear Paula,
Your son-in-law encountered a Wheel Bug, the largest, predatory Assassin Bug in North America.  Though many Assassin Bugs will bite if provoked or if they feel threatened, and though the bite might be painful, Wheel Bugs are reluctant to bite humans and the bite is not considered dangerous.